Let it Rain!

Yesterday, I posted a couple painting videos on Instagram. To watch, click the feed on the right.

Instagram videos can be up to one minute.

On Tuesday, John spent the day cutting in both rooms.

There are so many gray hues to choose from at Sherwin Williams.

When John brushed on the first stroke of color in the room filled with natural light, I was instantly happy.

I asked John if I could help with cutting in the bonus room. He said, “Let me do it and you can help later with the other rooms.”

Hmmmmmm

Concentrating with a very steady brush…

John said, “You can tell this is quality paint; it goes on like Teflon.”

Back in the mudroom where I cracked a joke.

The mudroom faces north so the paint appears a smidge darker.

We decided to paint the beam gray and the underside white.

The wall on the right leading upstairs will be painted bright white along with the door and windowsills.

After finishing cutting in both rooms, the last step before rolling the walls is to run a spackle knife over the primed sections. This takes off any specs making a totally smooth surface before applying the finish coat.

NEXT: Rolling the walls!

 

I Chose Sherwin-Williams ‘Let it Rain’ for the Walls

The mudroom and bonus room are the first two rooms to be painted with color. Both rooms are on the ground level where the garage is located. The mudroom faces north and the bonus room faces south. However, on a bright sunny day, such as today, the north-facing mudroom is filled with natural light.

I love color so I’m not really someone that is going to choose neutrals for my walls, however for these two rooms I wanted a color that goes well with a lot of other colors. I thought of gray right away but it had to be the right shade of gray; I didn’t want it too dark and I didn’t want it too light.

Gray paired with the white ceiling and white deep window sills, creates a nice crisp, clean contrast.

After a little bit of research, I discovered gray happens to be the new “IT” neutral.

So off I went to my local Sherwin-Williams store where I picked out all the paint chips in the gray family. I brought them home and I took over a week deciding on which shade of gray to choose. Of course, I asked for John’s input; fortunately we have similar tastes in decorating and design. In fact, in some ways, he has a better eye than I do (on certain things).

In the past few years, gray has undergone a transformation. Gray is no longer perceived as a gloomy color, instead it’s perceived as stylish and sophisticated. Almost any color goes with it, after all it’s black and white blended together.

So after much consideration I chose ‘Let it Rain.’  It’s classically pretty and a tad darker than a pastel gray.

I picked up 5 gallons of Emerald® which is Sherwin-Williams finest paint and primer in a satin finish (same as eggshell) so that the walls can be easily cleaned with a sponge. Emerald provides washability in all finishes along with advance stain blocking technology.

When the sales person placed the first gallon on the counter, I looked down at the paint sample on the lid and instantly knew I chose the correct gray hue.

After three straight years of working on this house, it was exciting to open up the first gallon of paint with color. Up until now, it’s been all primer for the drywall.

Of course, I had to take step-by-step photos. When John took the lid off, he said, “That’s a pretty color.” “It’s exactly what we wanted.”

After a little bit of stirring, the paint was ready to be poured in the cut bucket.

Yummy!

John’s favorite cut bucket is a Folgers coffee container because it has a handle so it’s easy to grasp and hold. I save every single one knowing we have an entire house to paint.

Now it’s time to cut in both rooms; the fun part begins!

 

Disclosure: I received paint from Sherwin-Williams as compensation for this blog post. All views and opinions expressed in the post are my own and no other compensation was provided.

 

 

Painting Ceilings on Ground Level

A few days ago, John used a 12″ roller for the mudroom ceiling. He switched to a 9″ roller when he painted the soffit.

He bought flat white ceiling paint.

Rolling ceilings is strenuous…

John finished rolling the Bonus Room ceiling this morning. Afterwards, he used a large tile sponge to wipe off any paint that touched the walls. If you’re going to paint, make sure to do this step before cutting in the walls.

He rolled the stairwell leading to the basement using the 12″ roller and then switched to the 9″ roller for the smaller area at the bottom.

And, yes, his arms burned rolling the ceilings!

Have a rag handy to wipe each end of the roller to prevent railroad tracks.

I took this photo right after John finished rolling the Bonus Room ceiling when it was still wet. It dries flat.

Have several work lights to see your work.

John used a 12″ and 9″ roller along with a cut-in paintbrush to do the ceilings.

Purdy brushes are the best to use; they’re expensive but worth every penny. They make painting jobs easier. We have bought tons of Purdy brushes through the years and won’t use any other brand.

To speed up the drying process, place box fans horizontally on top of 6′ ladders. While drying, shift to another room.