Front Stoop Ideas: Bluestone & Brick

I found two photos of front stoops with flagstone/bluestone landings and treads along with brick risers.

Photo: Courtesy of Pinterest

Having brick risers will tie in the brick from the house.

Photo: Courtesy of Pinterest

I also like a brick border for the flagstone walkway. Flagstone is available in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from one to four inches. It’s usually bundled on wooden pallets and sold by weight. One pallet (depending on thickness) usually covers 80 to 100 square feet of walkway.

 

The support I receive from voluntary subscriptions and from blog subscribers, new and old, is essential in order to continue Brick House 319. The blog is a labor of love where I strive to offer invaluable tips. A voluntary subscription of only $1 annually will help in covering annual hosting fees. Thank you for reading my blog and for your support.

 

 

 

 

How to Dig a Footing for a Front Stoop

While John dug the footing, I perused Pinterest for front stoop designs using bluestone and brick. (I’ll post the photo later.)

Once the east and west trench footings were dug out to 3 feet, John had to determine how far out to make the trench on the south side (where the purple line is in the photo).

John called Ron, the mason, and he came over to take a look. The cement block will end close to where the purple line is sprayed.

Once again, John’s Gorilla ladder bench came in handy. He uses it for every project in the house. It’s also great for pick-up truck owners to use for stepping up onto the tailgate.

The south side trench footing is now about 3 feet deep.

By using the recycling buckets, the worksite remains clean. Otherwise, a big pile of dirt would be on the lawn.

After the trench footings are filled with the recycled pieces of concrete and poured concrete, the mason will put 2 or 3 courses of cement block on the footing.

The pick axe, a couple of shale bars and spade shovel finished the job.

The shale bars (two different sizes) helped 3 feet down where the soil is like clay.

If any of you want to save on a gym membership, just start digging a ditch–it will give you a complete workout.

Be careful using a pick axe because it can easily bounce off a rock and head right for your foot or ankle.

It’s also difficult using a pick axe in tight quarters.

Obviously, the best route to take is to hire someone to do this type of manual labor/job. It’s not easy and it’s time consuming.

While John was digging, he hit a pipe. It turned out that it was the conduit which leads to the basement block wall that the previous owner, Bill, had installed. He ran exterior wire to the front oak tree for power.

The conduit leads 18 feet south toward the road where the wire remains at the front lawn even though the tree was taken down.

The support I receive from voluntary subscriptions and from blog subscribers, new and old, is essential in order to continue Brick House 319. The blog is a labor of love where I strive to offer invaluable tips. A voluntary subscription of only $1 annually will help in covering annual hosting fees. Thank you for reading my blog and for your support.

 

 

The Footing for the Front Stoop

A few days ago, John started working at the front of the house. The front stoop and walkway is the next project.

The temporary framing that was supporting the barrel front porch was actually right where the footing for the new front stoop needed to be dug so John moved the posts another 3 feet. He also added two 2x4x16 diagonals to prevent the posts from kicking out.

He marked the new footing location with purple spray paint before digging.

He also broke up part of the concrete walkway; the broken (recycled) concrete will be used later to fill the trench footings (less bags of concrete will be purchased).

John hung a plumb line from the double 2×10/porch straight down to ground.

While John dug the footing, he used heavy duty recycling buckets to hold the dirt. When each bucket weighed about 75lbs, he dumped them into larger buckets that were in the back of his pick up truck. The larger bucket(s) weighed about 600lbs each with dirt and stone.

He pulled each bucket off his truck, rolled it on the ground and stored them for later use (backfill and grading the backyard).

From the outside of the double 2×10, John used a 1 1/4″ sheetrock screw in-between two 2x10s. For a plumb line, he attached an adjustable wrench to the end of string one inch from the ground.

Hanging the plumb line(s) gave John the exact location on the ground so that he knew where to spray the paint and begin digging.

He did the same on the right side.

Before swinging the pick axe, John scraped along the paint line a couple of inches. He used a shale bar and spade shovel too. The spade shovel scrapes the sides of the footing trench clean.

When digging holes, you can use a PHD. We have too much shale so a PHD will not work.

The footings have to be 3 feet deep.

Measure depth as you go!

 

1stdibs Daily Pick: Something Affordable

Photo Credit: Painted Porch Country Antiques/1stdibs.com

Whiteware Ice Bucket from England-1890

The bowl is a mystery as to how it was used with the ice bucket.

Price: $250