Installation of Outlets, Switches & HALO High Hats

How to wire a house…

image

John drilled the holes for the 14/2 wire with a 1/2″ Milwaukee drill and a 3/4″ spade bit. Once the holes were drilled for each room throughout the house for outlets, switches and HALO high hats, he ran the “home runs” from the 200 AMP box. The 1000ft roll was pulled to each room, powering the outlets first and the switches. Next, the high hat wires were taken from the ceiling down to the powered switch box.

A word of caution: When drilling through narrow areas be extremely careful to hold the drill handle tightly or you WILL lose control of the drill with the LOCK in the ON position. The drill can and will rip out of your hands; it will can break your wrist or spin wildly out of control and possibly do serious injury. (WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!!!!) Do Not have the Lock on–Have it in the OFF position.

John was on a 4 foot ladder in the mudroom with the drill locked “on.” I was standing a few feet away and the drill escaped his grip, wildly twisting out of his hands. It was one of those moments when time stopped. The drill was spinning VIOLENTLY out of control with the spade bit dangerously aiming toward John’s head. He was an inch or two from disaster.

The drill slammed to the floor and John yelled, “unplug it.” I couldn’t react quick enough since there were many extension cords on the floor, and also, I couldn’t get to the cords because of the drill on attack mode.

John was able to unplug it before the power cord wrapped around the tornado drill. This could have been disastrous. So NEVER have the lock “on” in tight places or where you can’t get a firm grip on the handle. (By locking the drill in the “on” position, holes are drilled faster; the major downside is that it’s dangerous). Things can go wrong quickly so it’s better to take the safer route.

image

Once the new construction high hat box has been opened, this exposes three Quick Connect  plug-in wires. They eliminate the need for wire-nuts and allows 1/2″ sheathing to be removed. After the outer sheathing is taken off,  1/2″ copper is exposed and inserted in the white, black and ground connectors.

image

John is cutting the outer sheathing to expose black, white and ground wires.

image

John then took 1/2″ off black and white wires and made connections. Dale, the electrician, told John NOT to take more than 1/2″ off, because if you do, after it’s plugged in, copper will be exposed and the inspector can fail inspection. (It would have to be done over.) Additionally, the 14/2 must be nailed 3″ from HALO high hats.

This isn’t as easy as it looks. After doing 40 high hats, it does a number on your hands, neck and wrists.

image

Looking at the black wire in the above photo, you will see 1/2″ copper exposed, plus the ground. John is inserting black to black, white to white and ground to ground.

image

John is inserting the white 14/2 wire into HALO’s Quick Connect which saves time and material (no wire nuts).

image

Black and white wires are connected and ground is next.

image

Now all the wires have been folded neatly in the HALO high hat box. For the final step, the 14/2 wire is stapled 3 inches from the box.

image

When stapling, plastic or metal can be used. Metal is less expensive than plastic but harder to nail. Plastic is easier to nail but more expensive; it’s more expensive because it’s a piece of plastic with two nails. The metal looks like a large staple.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*