Home Office is Ready for Finish Coat

A couple of weeks ago, John finished the first coat of “mud” in my future home office.

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I’m thinking about what color(s) I want for the walls; I might do a faux finish or wall stencils above the chair rail.

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We may have found someone to come in to do the finish coat. However, the person hasn’t called back to set up an appointment to look at the house and give us a price.

Most people want the whole job and aren’t open to coming in to do just the “finish coat.”

In the real DIY world, you better know how to do the finish coat because trying to find someone is nearly impossible. One guy said, “I want to get in and out and I do the whole job.”

Moving on…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Garage Sale Makeover Using RUST-OLEUM

A few years ago, I rescued this fleur-de-lis metal garden planter from winding up in a dumpster. It was one of many items at an off-the-beaten-path garage sale which had not been advertised. It wasn’t sold and I acquired it with few other garden treasures.

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It was in need of a makeover. This week I finally got around to giving it a fresh coat of paint.

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I lightly sanded the frame with 150-grit fine sandpaper and a foam sanding block.

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As I sanded away the top layer of chipped antique white paint I exposed the original color–avocado green. Could this be a vintage wall planter?

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I used RUST-OLOEUM Paint + Primer in Satin Heirloom White purchased at Lowes.

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It didn’t take long to spray the planter with two nice even coats.

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It’s always amazing what a fresh coat of paint will do for almost anything.

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I added a window box with low-maintenance Vinca. I love Vinca because it densely fills planters, it doesn’t require deadheading or pinching back and it tolerates extreme heat and humidity. The leaves are glossy green and the flowers always look healthy throughout the entire summer.

I can actually use the same can of RUST-OLEUM to paint the Terra Poly plastic window box as well. I had used it on a terra-cotta pot last month with great results. It can be used on almost any surface.

 

Picking Tomatoes

Last night, I picked a bucket full of Better Boy and Early Girl tomatoes from my garden as well as smaller tomatoes from the containers.

It’s recommended leaving tomatoes on the vine as long as possible. Pick them when they’re ripe and very red in color. It’s okay if there is yellow remaining around the stem.

Ripe fruit sinks in water.

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Home Office

Yesterday, John began taping and spackling the ceiling in my future home office. This is the smallest of the three original bedrooms. The room faces south and it’s the perfect size for a cozy office.

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This morning, he used the Sawzall to cut the Sheetrock exposing the 3′ x 4′ window overlooking the front yard.

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The small drywall knife came in handy too…

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The light is coming through…

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The original part of the house did not have 2×4 walls. The rooms only had 3/4″ nailing strips nailed in the block with masonry nails. Literally, there wasn’t room for insulation. John put in 2×4 walls that allowed R15 insulation in the new walls along with the outlets, RG6 (TV wire) and CAT6 (communication wire).

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When John added the 2×4 walls and packed them out, he created 6″ deep window sills in all the original three bedrooms. We love deep window sills usually found in old homes.

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The window is now exposed with light flooding in the room. It’s finished with 3/4″ pressure-treated plywood.

My desk will be placed underneath the window.

On the project list is green giant arborvitae lining the road for privacy screening. Since the front yard is in full sun, I’m considering a front yard vegetable garden next year. I recently borrowed an inspiring book from the library called The Edible Front Yard  and now have big ideas.

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The driveway entrance puddles with rainwater and needs to be raised to meet the road (also on the “To Do List”.)

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Deep window sills add dimension to a room and makes a home extra special.