Simpson Thermal French Door for Mudroom

The Simpson exterior door for the mudroom was delivered to the house in November 2015. But with everything on our To Do list, installing the door was placed on the back burner.

The main reason this project was delayed for a seriously long time is that John doesn’t have too much experience hanging doors. Also, most doors arrive pre-hung and this door is not pre-hung; we intentionally ordered the door this way because the 2×4 walls were not built at the time I ordered it. (We didn’t have the jamb size until after John built the walls.)

This project will entail John to custom cut the jamb and hang the door. (He might hire someone to help him with this project.)

At first this was a little confusing for me because we have a brick house with  interior masonry walls (original parged block walls). And John built 2×4 walls a half inch off the masonry to allow for the electric, insulation and drywall. Therefore, the size of the jamb was an unknown at the time and not included with the door order.

The 7106 Simpson Thermal French Simpson Exterior Door is constructed with Select Fir, Water Barrier with Ultrablock. The glass is 3/4″ insulated glazing.

I chose this style with all glass to maximize on the natural light flooding the mudroom and also to look out at the patio + backyard.

The mudroom is on the ground level which leads out to the patio. As you can see in these photos I took this morning, the drywall needs to be finished on this level (+ the basement).

The original dreary-looking brown and beige tile floor will be replaced with new tile. (I have my eye on tile that looks like wood.)

Here is the original back door in the mudroom which is annoying to open and close because it has swollen over the years (original owner had rotted gutters and the rain poured on the door for decades).

In order to open the door, we have to pull hard on the door knob, and to close it, we have to slam it. Plus, the old door is dirty. I can’t wait to have the brand new door installed!

Above the door, John sprayed orange fire blocking foam (required by the township).

Here is the exterior where the wood jamb is visible with masonry on the left and right to fill the gap–done in 1954. The header is metal which will remain when John installs the new jamb.

Sounds pretty exciting, doesn’t it?

 

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Still Digging

This morning, John finished digging the last bit of dirt for the footing, making sure it’s 36″ deep and level.

It’s important to scrape off the last inch or so to virgin soil. You can’t dig too much dirt out and then add dirt; it won’t be compact enough for the weight of the concrete.

When the footing is inspected, the inspector uses a tool to ensure the dirt is untouched.

Have a SAFE Memorial Day Weekend!

 

 

Front Stoop Ideas: Bluestone & Brick

I found two photos of front stoops with flagstone/bluestone landings and treads along with brick risers.

Photo: Courtesy of Pinterest

Having brick risers will tie in the brick from the house.

Photo: Courtesy of Pinterest

I also like a brick border for the flagstone walkway. Flagstone is available in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from one to four inches. It’s usually bundled on wooden pallets and sold by weight. One pallet (depending on thickness) usually covers 80 to 100 square feet of walkway.

 

The support I receive from voluntary subscriptions and from blog subscribers, new and old, is essential in order to continue Brick House 319. The blog is a labor of love where I strive to offer invaluable tips. A voluntary subscription of only $1 annually will help in covering annual hosting fees. Thank you for reading my blog and for your support.

 

 

 

 

How to Dig a Footing for a Front Stoop

While John dug the footing, I perused Pinterest for front stoop designs using bluestone and brick. (I’ll post the photo later.)

Once the east and west trench footings were dug out to 3 feet, John had to determine how far out to make the trench on the south side (where the purple line is in the photo).

John called Ron, the mason, and he came over to take a look. The cement block will end close to where the purple line is sprayed.

Once again, John’s Gorilla ladder bench came in handy. He uses it for every project in the house. It’s also great for pick-up truck owners to use for stepping up onto the tailgate.

The south side trench footing is now about 3 feet deep.

By using the recycling buckets, the worksite remains clean. Otherwise, a big pile of dirt would be on the lawn.

After the trench footings are filled with the recycled pieces of concrete and poured concrete, the mason will put 2 or 3 courses of cement block on the footing.

The pick axe, a couple of shale bars and spade shovel finished the job.

The shale bars (two different sizes) helped 3 feet down where the soil is like clay.

If any of you want to save on a gym membership, just start digging a ditch–it will give you a complete workout.

Be careful using a pick axe because it can easily bounce off a rock and head right for your foot or ankle.

It’s also difficult using a pick axe in tight quarters.

Obviously, the best route to take is to hire someone to do this type of manual labor/job. It’s not easy and it’s time consuming.

While John was digging, he hit a pipe. It turned out that it was the conduit which leads to the basement block wall that the previous owner, Bill, had installed. He ran exterior wire to the front oak tree for power.

The conduit leads 18 feet south toward the road where the wire remains at the front lawn even though the tree was taken down.

The support I receive from voluntary subscriptions and from blog subscribers, new and old, is essential in order to continue Brick House 319. The blog is a labor of love where I strive to offer invaluable tips. A voluntary subscription of only $1 annually will help in covering annual hosting fees. Thank you for reading my blog and for your support.