Going Up!

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After installing the drywall in the dining area, John continued in the living room.

He’ll need to get a second person to help him with the 20ft vaulted ceiling so he installed 12ft Sheetrock panels as far up on the walls as he could–stopping just before the ceiling. In this photo he’s installing the drywall to the new master bedroom wing. I stood upstairs in the master bedroom bathroom while John lifted the panel up from the ladder. I temporarily held the top of the panel in place, while he drilled the initial screws to anchor it.

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To the left of John–where you can see a couple of boxes–there will be a balcony overlooking the living room, front door and fireplace. In front of John is the walk-in shower and water closet.

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From the balcony, we can look out the two large windows at the front of the house. The living room space with the vaulted ceiling and fireplace reminds me of a ski lodge.

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The dining area and kitchen entrance…

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In this photo, you can see to the left and right of the ladder, John nailed two pieces of 3/4″ 2ft long plywood to use as ledgers for the Sheetrock panels. Without these ledgers, John would have to physically hold each 12ft panel while screwing it in, which would be very difficult.

Joe, who worked at the house doing the siding with John (and the bay window roof) came over and gave John this great tip about using ledgers. Without his tip, we would not have been able to do this single handedly (or double handedly with my little bit of help).

Additionally, the scaffolding in the living room, loaned to us by our mason, was a big help because John placed tools and screws on the platform.

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For the second panel, I did the same thing–I stood on a 4ft ladder in the water closet and grabbed the top of the panel as John lifted it up the ladder.

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I was really, really happy to have the master bathroom closed up because it’s now safe for our pug to go up there–he’s never ventured up there as it’s blocked off at the bottom of the staircase. The staircase will be replaced; they’re the steps to the original attic and too shallow.

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John used a T-square to plumb down the center of the studs; it makes a drywall job more professional–everything is nice and neat.

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The screws look orderly. John said it’s critical to have a screw schedule–8″ on perimeter and 12″ in the field. He makes a mark at 12″, 24″ and 36.” This makes the screws equidistant resulting in a professional look.

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The drywall for the vaulted ceiling will be very soon…

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John went up as high as he could with the Sheetrock panels and put back the temporary balcony to the left.

It’s amazing seeing walls! Having walls makes it all suddenly come together. When drywall goes up, it’s an instant wow factor, because for so long, the work that was being done was the mechanicals. It drags on and you start to think, “Will this ever be a real house with living space?” When the drywall phase begins, it truly is the stage in the renovation process where major progress is seen. To us, it looks like it’s finished even though taping, mud and sanding is next.

6 thoughts on “Going Up!

  1. Wonderful ! You’re right, though, taping and floating is another big job !! Are you going to blow on texture or keep the wall smooth ? Here in Texas, almost all walls have some sort of texture- a smooth wall is a rare thing.

  2. You and John are marvels. You’ve done so much work transforming a hoarder’s lair to a house that will soon be a stunning home. It has been fascinating and inspiring following your journey

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